Enter your search terms:
Top

Understanding LEED® Version 4

Green Buildings in Context

In successful enterprises throughout the world, sustainability permeates strategies, business plans and operations. Leading organizations recognize that when they align the social, economic and environmental impacts of business decisions with their company’s purpose and values, the outcomes can be substantial: improved business results, enhanced reputation, and optimized value proposition for all stakeholders.

As important as products, services, and operations are to sustainable practices, buildings are also a crucial factor to consider. Buildings exert tremendous impact on materials consumption, energy use and waste output, which directly influences the environmental health, quality of life and social fabric of communities. Notably, the building sector uses more of the world’s energy demand than either the manufacturing or transportation sectors – buildings account for 41 percent compared to 30 percent and 29 percent respectively1. In addition to environmental burdens, buildings and interior spaces design can have direct financial impacts to occupants or owners. Examples would include HVAC & electricity expenses, user productivity, and the investment return or loss from attracting and retaining talent or lessees.

For more than two decades, growing awareness of the impact of buildings has driven new standards, legislation and certifications. LEED® (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) was launched in the United States in 1998 by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC), a coalition of leaders representing several building industry sectors. Today there are many programs for green buildings in countries throughout the world, with LEED being perhaps the better known and most followed, with projects in 140 countries and territories.2

Looking ahead, the most substantial area of “green building” growth is expected to occur in new commercial construction. Robust growth is also anticipated in existing building retrofits and new schools and hospitals (institutional construction).3


Changes in LEED v4

To set an even higher standard for improved environmental outcomes, the U.S. Green Building Council has changed the LEED Green Building Rating System. All projects registered after October 31, 2016, are to be evaluated under the LEED v4 rating system. According to USGBC, LEED v4 is designed to drive innovation in every aspect of the building lifecycle, enabling project teams to make more informed decisions that will have greater overall benefit for the environmental, human health, and communities.4

With this broadened perspective however, the rating system becomes significantly more complex. A few key examples can be illustrated in the changes that some of the new credits are written and weighted:

  • Certain credits from LEED 2009 are incorporated as subset options of larger, multi-attribute credits in v4.
  • Major parts of Materials and Resources credit weightings have changed from calculating by percentage spend, to the requirement of selecting at least twenty products sourced from five different manufacturers that meet the criteria.
  • And overall, contributions to the Materials and Resources section has been elevated to require rigorous product and manufacturer information that only a limited number of companies have actively acquired.

While these changes encourage project teams to more holistically include a wider diversity of material and product contributions, this also narrows the potential contributions from any individual manufacturer or supplier.

USGBC states that LEED v4 encompasses international requirements to achieve these high-level goals:

  • Reduce contribution to global climate change
  • Enhance individual human health (new emphasis)
  • Protect and restore water resources
  • Protect and enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services (new emphasis)
  • Promote sustainable and regenerative material cycles (new emphasis)
  • Build a green economy (new emphasis)
  • Enhance community quality of life (new emphasis)

(function ($) {
$( document ).ready( function() {
if( jQuery( window ).width() < 768 ){
jQuery('body').addClass('charts-legend-horizontal');
}
tooltipSuffix = '';
yAC = ["North America","Latin America","Europe","Middle East + North Africa","East Asia"];
yAxisCats = [];
for (i=0;i 767 ) ? ‘e’ : ‘n’,
showSwatch: true,
placement: ‘outsideGrid’,
renderer: jQuery.jqplot.EnhancedLegendRenderer,
rendererOptions: {
disableIEFading: true
}
},
cursor: {
show: false
},
series: yAxisCats,
seriesColors: [“#0033a0″,”#0195db”,”#3a8d31″,”#99cc0d”,”#722283″,”#bf40d5″,”#b15300″,”#f27d00″,”#8d002b”,”#db001a”],
axesDefaults: {
tickRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisTickRenderer,
tickOptions: {
angle: 0,
fontSize: ’11px’,
fontWeight: ‘normal’,
_styles: {
‘padding’: ‘4px 0px 8px’,
‘font-weight’: ‘light’
}
}
},
axesStyles: {
borderWidth: 0,
label: {
fontFamily: ‘Arial’,
textColor: ‘#666′
}
},
axes: {
xaxis: {
label: ”,
renderer: jQuery.jqplot.CategoryAxisRenderer,
labelRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisLabelRenderer,
tickOptions: {
mark: false
},
labelOptions: {
show: true,
fontSize: ’14px’
}
},
yaxis:{
renderer: jQuery.jqplot.LogAxisRenderer,
tickRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisTickRenderer,
labelRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisLabelRenderer,
label: ”,
labelOptions: {
show: true,
fontSize: ’14px’
},
tickOptions: {
mark: false,
labelPosition: ‘middle’
}
}
}
});
// Handle legend hiding on the client
if(true === false) {
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_16 .jqplot-table-legend’).remove();
} else {
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_16 .jqplot-table-legend’).show();
}
// Bind tooltips
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_16’).bind(‘jqplotDataMouseOver’, function (ev, seriesIndex, pointIndex, data) {
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_16 .jqplot-highlighter-tooltip’).html(” + data[1] + ”);
});
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_16’).addClass(‘type-bar’);
// Resize charts
$(document).on( ‘steelcase_resize_executed’, function(){
if(chart_16.target.is(‘.type-bar’)){
$.each(chart_16.series, function(index, series) { series.barWidth = undefined; });
}
chart_16.replot({ resetAxes: true });
} );
});})(jQuery);

Other Regions
South Asia 8.2 GSM
Africa 0.8 GSM
South Pacific 0.6 GSM

Gross square meters (GSM) are reported in millions. Includes projects registered through the USGBC, GBCI, Canada GBC, and Indian GBC (partial data). National Trust for Historic Preservation, 2011

(function ($) {
$( document ).ready( function() {
if( jQuery( window ).width() < 768 ){
jQuery('body').addClass('charts-legend-horizontal');
}
tooltipSuffix = '%';
yAC = ["New Commercial Construction","Existing Buildings/Retrofit","New Institutional Construction","Communities","New High-Rise Residential","Commercial Interiors","New Low-Rise Residential"];
yAxisCats = [];
for (i=0;i 767 ) ? ‘e’ : ‘n’,
showSwatch: true,
placement: ‘outsideGrid’,
renderer: jQuery.jqplot.EnhancedLegendRenderer,
rendererOptions: {
disableIEFading: true
}
},
cursor: {
show: false
},
series: yAxisCats,
seriesColors: [“#0033a0″,”#0195db”,”#3a8d31″,”#99cc0d”,”#722283″,”#bf40d5″,”#b15300″,”#f27d00″,”#8d002b”,”#db001a”],
axesDefaults: {
tickRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisTickRenderer,
tickOptions: {
angle: 0,
fontSize: ’11px’,
fontWeight: ‘normal’,
_styles: {
‘padding’: ‘4px 0px 8px’,
‘font-weight’: ‘light’
}
}
},
axesStyles: {
borderWidth: 0,
label: {
fontFamily: ‘Arial’,
textColor: ‘#666′
}
},
axes: {
xaxis: {
label: ”,
renderer: jQuery.jqplot.CategoryAxisRenderer,
labelRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisLabelRenderer,
tickOptions: {
mark: false
},
labelOptions: {
show: true,
fontSize: ’14px’
}
},
yaxis:{
renderer: jQuery.jqplot.LogAxisRenderer,
tickRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisTickRenderer,
labelRenderer: jQuery.jqplot.CanvasAxisLabelRenderer,
label: ”,
labelOptions: {
show: true,
fontSize: ’14px’
},
tickOptions: {
mark: false,
labelPosition: ‘middle’
}
}
}
});
// Handle legend hiding on the client
if(true === false) {
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_17 .jqplot-table-legend’).remove();
} else {
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_17 .jqplot-table-legend’).show();
}
// Bind tooltips
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_17’).bind(‘jqplotDataMouseOver’, function (ev, seriesIndex, pointIndex, data) {
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_17 .jqplot-highlighter-tooltip’).html(” + data[1] + ‘%’);
});
jQuery(‘#rjqc_container_17’).addClass(‘type-bar’);
// Resize charts
$(document).on( ‘steelcase_resize_executed’, function(){
if(chart_17.target.is(‘.type-bar’)){
$.each(chart_17.series, function(index, series) { series.barWidth = undefined; });
}
chart_17.replot({ resetAxes: true });
} );
});})(jQuery);

Source: McGrawHill Construction, 2013

LEED V4 Rating System Categories

Among LEED v4’s overarching changes is the creation of new system categories to assure LEED fits the unique aspects of projects such as data centers, hospitality facilities, distribution centers, warehouses, and other specialized buildings.

As illustrated here, the LEED v4 rating system addresses 4 major rating systems divided into 21 market sectors:

Building Design and Construction

  • New Construction
  • Core & Shell
  • Schools
  • Retail
  • Hospitality
  • Data Centers
  • Warehouse & Distribution Centers
  • Healthcare
  • Homes
  • Midrise

Interior Design and Construction

  • Commercial Interiors
  • Retail
  • Hospitality

Neighborhood Development

  • Neighborhood Development Plan
  • Neighborhood Development

Building Operations and Maintenance

  • Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance
  • Schools
  • Retail
  • Hospitality
  • Data Centers
  • Warehouses & Distribution Centers

New LEED V4 Credits

LEED v4 comprises a significant number of credit changes. While some are merely relocations of previous-version credits into different categories, there are also brand-new credits, prerequisites and categories. Another noticeable change to the navigation of the rating system is the elimination of credit numeration. This was intended by the USGBC to direct the focus of users to the purpose of the credit, rather than the order it falls into the LEED checklists.

As an example, two new credit categories—Location & Transportation and Integrative Process—place more focus on location and early analysis of energy and water systems to inform design of New Construction projects. To follow, there are new prerequisites present in the evolved rating systems that require metering energy and water use, emphasizing a project’s performance post-construction or renovation. Another example to cite is the renaming of Innovation & Design credit category to just be called “Innovation” to reflect v4’s broader perspective.

New LEED v4 Credits
LEED 2009 Credit Categories LEED V4 Credit Categories
Integrative Process (new!)
Sustainable Location + Transportation (incorporates Sustainable Sites)
Water Efficiency Water Efficiency
Energy + Atmosphere Energy + Atmosphere
Materials + Resources Materials + Resources
Indoor Environmental Quality Indoor Environmental Quality
Innovation + Design Innovation
Regional Priority Regional Priority

Another adaption in LEED v4 is a heavier emphasis to the Long-Term Commitment credit – exclusive to Commercial Interiors, Retail Commercial Interiors and Hospitality Commercial Interiors. It awards one point for making a written commitment to remain in the same location for at least 10 years.

A New Focus on Materials and Resources

Especially significant for Steelcase customers are the substantial changes in the Materials & Resources credit opportunities, found within Building Design and Construction and Interior Design and Construction rating systems. While continuing to focus on waste reduction and reuse, LEED v4 sets a more demanding, higher standard with new required prerequisites and more challenging optional credits that offer a range of points.

In previous versions of LEED, credit criteria focused on information covering recycled content data, VOC (volatile organic compound) off gassing levels and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) wood. In comparison, LEED v4 builds onto these categories to award new credit points for selecting products from manufacturers that provide: comprehensive material transparency; product life cycle assessment results; as well as selecting products designed for flexibility in multiple uses. In addition, the definition of locally sourced products has become narrower (100-mile radius in v4 compared to 500-mile radius in LEED 2009), and responsible sourcing criteria has been expanded to raw material sourcing and extraction reporting.

LEED v4 also makes changes within the Building Operations and Maintenance: Existing Buildings rating system as it relates to building Materials and Resources, including furniture. Though less extensive than the changes to the other major rating systems, similar changes can be seen throughout these credits such as awarding points for sourcing products that have inventoried and / or assessed chemical ingredients.

Within Materials & Resources for BD+C, NC, and O+M rating systems, waste-management planning is a part of an expanded set of prerequisites. Another distinct change is that many contributions of the LEED 2009 MR credits (true for some EQ credits, as well) are integrated into the newly named credits, but with added guidelines – resulting in the multi-attribute credits that have been mentioned.

As an example, the BD+C New Construction rating system, has this new prerequisite, and five new multi-attribute credit options in v4 that replace seven in LEED 2009, as illustrated below.

LEED 2009 (14 total possible points)
MRp1 Storage and collection of recyclables Required
MRc1.1 Building reuse -maintain existing walls, floors and roof 3 possible points
MRc1.2 Building reuse -maintain interior nonstructural elements 1 possible point
MRc2 Construction waste management 2 possible points
MRc3 Materials reuse 2 possible points
MRc4 Recycled content 2 possible points
MRc5 Regional materials 2 possible points
MRc6 Rapidly renewable materials 1 possible point
MRc7 Certified Wood 1 possible point
LEED V4 – BD + C (13 total possible points)
Prereq Storage and collection of recyclables Required
Prereq Construction and demolition waste management planning Required
Credit Building life-cycle impact reduction 5 possible points
Credit Building product disclosure and optimization -environmental product declarations* 2 possible points
Credit Building product disclosure and optimization -sourcing of raw materials* 2 possible points
Credit Building product disclosure and optimization -material ingredients* 2 possible points
Credit Construction and demolition waste management 2 possible points
 *if products meet criteria for this credit are also locally sourced (i.e. extracted, manufactured, and purchased within 100 miles of product site) they are valued at 200% of actual cost for purposes of credit calculation.

Source: USGBC LEED Credit Library

Life cycle impact reduction

Most of the changes for the Materials & Resources credits are paralleled in both the Interior Design and Construction and Building Design and Construction rating systems. One major exception is the Life Cycle Impact Reduction credit. Furniture falls within the scope of the interiors version of this credit, which encourages furniture reuse and designing for flexibility to increase the useful life of a space. This credit emerged from the LEED 2009 credit that encouraged new applications for existing interior elements.

Within Materials & Resources, three new Building Product Disclosure and Optimization (BPDO) credit options are directly related to interior furnishings selections. All three encourage selecting interior architecture products, furniture, and materials for which life-cycle information is available. In addition, all three offer a bonus for locally sourced materials: If products are extracted, manufactured and purchased within 100 miles of the project site, they are valued at 200 percent of actual costs in the credit calculation.

BPDO credit for Environmental Product Declarations (up to 2 points)

This LEED v4 credit recognizes Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) as third-party-verified documentation to communicate the calculated results of a life cycle assessment for a product. One point is awarded for collecting EPDs on twenty different products, sourced from five different manufacturers. Another point is available for showing that product impact is reduced below industry averages. As referenced, this is one example of how LEED has evolved from single-attribute contributions, to a more holistic assessment of environmental impact across the entire life cycle of a product.

BPDO Credit for Sourcing of Raw Materials (up to 2 points)

This credit rewards selecting products from manufacturers that publicly report their raw material suppliers and extraction locations. One point is awarded for using at least twenty different permanently installed products sourced from at least five different manufacturers that meet the criteria; in effect, this means the potential contribution from a single manufacturer is reduced in comparison to LEED 2009).

Another point is available for choosing products that meet at least one of six responsible sourcing criteria:

  • Extended producer responsibility
  • Bio-based materials
  • Wood products
  • Materials reuse
  • Recycled content
  • USGBC-approved program meeting leadership extraction criteria

These products must account for at least 25 percent of the total value of permanently installed building products. Designed to prompt more transparency and examination of supply chains, this credit is another example of how LEED v4 is aspiring to shift expectations and market realities.

BPDO credit for Material Ingredients (up to 2 points)

This credit promotes choosing products that have disclosed ingredients through reporting programs such as Cradle to Cradle Certified™, Health Product Declarations, GreenScreen benchmark, or other reporting programs. One point can be earned by using at least 20 different permanently installed products from at least five different manufacturers that demonstrate the inventory of a product to at least 0.1 percent (1,000 parts per million). Other point options recognize documentation that products have avoided using materials that are known hazards to human or environmental health. Qualifying products must equal at least 25 percent of the total value, by cost, of permanently installed product.

Low-emitting materials (up to 2 points)

Within this credit, LEED v4 continues to recognize Low-Emitting Materials in the Interior Environmental Quality section, but has essentially combined several categories of materials (paints, adhesives, flooring, ceiling, walls, and furniture) into one comprehensive credit. While outside of the Materials and Resources category, the focus is to test and limit the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from products and materials to indoor air environments. Low-emitting furniture is one of the six possible categories under the Building Design and Construction system, and Building Operations and Maintenance rating system, and one of five categories under the Interior Design and Construction rating system.

Interior lighting (up to 2 points)

The purpose of this credit is to allow user lighting control of lighting while encouraging productivity and comfort through lighting quality. There are several qualitative factors and quantitative measurements to consider in pursuit of the prescribed strategies of this credit, though most are targeted towards illuminance and controllability of lighting fixtures. However, furniture surface reflectance is called out in option two of this credit as one of several strategy options to choose from. Contributions will be limited here, as project teams must select four of these strategies for one possible point.

Pilot credits (varying point opportunities)

Pilot credits are contribution areas that are being tested within the rating system for potential inclusion in the future. Most pilot credits available just offer one point, typically focusing on a more granular extension of an existing LEED category. As an example, the “Environmentally preferable interior finishes and furnishings” pilot seeks to “increase the use of interior finishes and furnishings with verified multi- attribute environmental profiles.”5

Products must demonstrate compliance to the ANSI/BIFMA e3 Sustainability Standard, through level® certification, in order to contribute to this pilot.


Steelcase Contributions to LEED

While the LEED v4 rating system sets the bar significantly higher than in past LEED versions, a long-standing commitment to insight-led product design positions Steelcase favorably to assist project teams that are seeking LEED certification. Steelcase products and applications have contributed to countless client LEED projects since 1998, and continued support is available to provide guidance and training programs to customers on how the product portfolio can contribute to LEED v4 criteria. Helping our customers to succeed in their businesses and meet their sustainability goals has been a driving force for Steelcase and its partners.

Furniture and interior architecture products can contribute to credits for LEED v4 in the Materials & Resources, Indoor Environmental Quality, some Pilot credit categories, and Innovation categories.

The new emphasis in LEED v4 on life-cycle impact and comprehensive materials transparency, gives credit for design strategies that Steelcase has been deploying for nearly two decades through the company’s sustainability design initiatives of materials chemistry, life-cycle assessment, and product reuse and recycling. At the same time, the contributions of any furnishings manufacturer, including Steelcase, have been reduced in LEED v4 Materials & Resources, which now awards points for the use of twenty permanently installed products from five different manufacturers that meet defined guidelines. This is true for other select credit categories, as mentioned for the Environmental Quality – combining the calculation of several unique credits into one Low Emitting Materials credit.

While LEED4 presents some new challenges, it also presents some new opportunities. In particular, the emphases on designing for flexibility, material ingredient reporting, and Environmental Product Declarations are credit opportunities that various Steelcase products can help achieve.

The charts on the following pages outline Steelcase’s direct and indirect contributions to pursuit of LEED certification across the Building Design & Construction, Interior Design & Construction and Operations & Maintenance systems.

For full credit language and additional details on the USGBC and the LEED rating systems visit usgbc.org.


Steelcase LEED – Certified Facilities

  • Leadership Community / Global Headquarter- Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • Steelcase University Learning Center – Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • WorkLab LEED CI Platinum Certified – Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • Innovation Center LEED CI Platinum Certified – Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • Steelcase WorkLife Center Merchandise Mart – Chicago, Illinois
  • Coalesse Showroom Merchandise Mart – Chicago, Illinois
  • Steelcase WorkLife Center – Washington, D.C.
  • Steelcase WorkLife Center – Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Global Business Center – Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Building Design + Construction: Materials and Resources Credits

Prerequisite Expanded: Construction and Demolition Waste Management Planning.

  • Requires setting a project target for waste management.
  • Requires reporting waste diversion rates.
  • Steelcase and Dealer Partners can help project teams estimate the weight of packaging from their furniture shipments.

Credit (New): Building Product Disclosure and Optimization— Environmental Product Declarations.

  • Addresses transparency in environmental life-cycle impacts and selecting products with improved life cycles.
  • Rewards the use of products with Environmental Product Declarations (EPD).
  • Steelcase has several EPDs for the Europe, Middle East, Africa (EMEA) market, and is developing more in this market, as well as for the North American market.

Credit (New): Building Product Disclosure and Optimization— Sourcing of Raw Materials.

  • Addresses transparency in raw material sourcing and selecting materials that have been appropriately sourced.
  • Rewards products from manufacturers that have provided information on land use practices, extraction locations, labor practices, etc.
  • Steelcase continually works with its supply chain on sustainability material sourcing topics like phasing out materials of concern and conflict mineral reporting, as well as participates in GRI reporting as part of our annual Corporate Sustainability Report. However, due to the scope of work, the Steelcase CSR does not report comprehensively on raw material source and extraction reporting- thus is not applicable to option 1 of this credit at this time.
  • Steelcase Phase 2 Program meets the Option 2 “Extended Producer Responsibility” criteria.
  • Steelcase products can help meet the “recycled content” and “materials reuse” criteria.
  • Select Steelcase materials have the potential to meet the “wood products” criteria.
  • A limited selection of surface materials have the potential to meet the “bio-based materials” criteria.

Credit (New): Building Product Disclosure and Optimization— Material Ingredient Reporting.

  • Addresses transparency in material ingredients and selecting products with optimized materials.
  • Rewards the use of products with ingredient reporting in programs such as Cradle to Cradle™ certification and Health Product Declarations.
  • Steelcase Cradle to Cradle™ certified products have the potential to meet this credit requirements. Contribution weightings will depend on level of certification.

Updated Healthcare Credit: Furniture and Medical Furnishings

  • Use at least 30% by cost, of all freestanding furniture and medical furnishings that meet the criteria in one of three options.
  • Under Option 1: Steelcase components that constitute at least 5% (by weight) of the furniture assembly contribute when they meet 4 of the 5 requirements for limited chemical content in the following groups:
    • urea formaldehyde
    • heavy metals including antimony, cadmium, lead, and mercury
    • hexavalent chromium
    • non-stick treatments derived from perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)
    • Added antimicrobials

For Option 1 Steelcase products that have gone through a thorough materials chemistry assessment have the potential to contribute, after confirming the chemical inventory of the products selected.

Steelcase products may contribute via Option 2 by complying with 3 of the 5 criteria above plus ANSI/BIFMA e3-2010 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 and 7.6.2, as represented in SCS Indoor Advantage™ Gold certifications (depending on product options).

Or under Option 3, Steelcase products may meet the criteria via:

  • select products with Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs)
  • if products are reused
  • recycled content valuation
  • Extender Producer Responsibility (Steelcase Phase 2 Program)
  • “bio-based” and “wood products” criteria, for which select materials can qualify, as defined in the “Sourcing of Raw Materials” credit

Updated Healthcare Credit: Design for Flexibility

  • Use demountable partitions for 50% of applicable areas.
  • Use movable or modular casework for at least 50% of casework and custom millwork.

Most Steelcase products, specifically architectural solutions and casegoods, are specifically designed for flexibility of space and to be demounted and/or reconfigured, to meet today’s and tomorrow’s needs.


Building Design + Construction: Indoor Environmental Quality Credits

Credit, Updated and consolidated: Low-Emitting Interiors

  • Credit is a combination of the “Low-Emitting Materials” credits.
  • Requirements based on VOC emissions rather than VOC content.
  • Systems approach to emissions within a space.
  • Added requirement for TVOC disclosure.
  • Modified requirements for formaldehyde.

Steelcase furniture certified for SCS Indoor Advantage™ may contribute depending on options. Products that contribute will demonstrate certification compliance to:

  • ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1
  • ANSI/BIFMA e3 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Credits 7.6.1 and 7.6.2
  • California Specification 01350 for classrooms

Credit, Updated and Renamed: Quality Views

  • Credit title renamed from “Daylight and Views—Views”.
  • Added requirement for quality view, defined by the LEED 2009 exemplary performance criteria.

Steelcase offers several products and thought starters to help achieve the requirements of this credit – yet, several other factors play into achieving this credit, beyond the scope of furniture.

Credit (New): Acoustic Performance

  • Added requirements for room noise levels, speech privacy and sound isolation, reverberation time, and paging, masking, and sound reinforcement systems.
  • Harmonized ANSI and ASHRAE standards.

While Steelcase has sound-tested architectural and workstation products, as well as sound masking products, contributions are limited due to the various other factors that can come into play for this credit.

Credit expanded: Interior Lighting

  • Two options centered around controllability and quality of interior lighting
  • Asks for a weighted average surface reflectance threshold of 45% of work surfaces and 50% for moveable partitions

Some Steelcase products may contribute to this strategy in Option 2 of this credit; however, contribution is very dependent on surface material options selected for each product.


Interior Design + Construction: Materials and Resources Credits

Prerequisite Expanded:Construction and Demolition Waste Management Planning

  • Requires setting a project target for waste management.
  • Requires reporting waste diversion rates.

Steelcase and dealer partners can help project teams estimate the weight of packaging from their furniture shipments.

New LEED V4: Interiors Life Cycle Impact Reduction

  • Credit is a combination of LEED 2009 “Materials Reuse” and “Materials Reuse – Furniture and Furnishings”
  • Encourages reuse of materials
  • Added option for Design for Flexibility.

Steelcase products are designed to be long-lasting and durable—often making reuse a feasible option, depending on project needs and desirability. Most Steelcase products, specifically architectural solutions and casegoods, are specifically designed for flexibility of space and to be demounted and/or reconfigured, to meet today’s and tomorrow’s needs.

New LEED V4: Building Product Disclosure and Optimization— Environmental Product Declarations

  • Addresses transparency in environmental life-cycle impacts and selecting products with improved life cycles.
  • Rewards the use of products with Environmental Product Declarations (EPD).

Steelcase has several EPDs for the Europe, Middle East, Africa (EMEA) market, and is developing more in this market, as well as for the North American market.

New LEED V4: Building Product Disclosure and Optimization— Sourcing of Raw Materials

  • Addresses transparency in raw material sourcing and selecting materials that have been appropriately sourced.
  • Rewards products from manufacturers that have provided information on land use practices, extraction locations, labor practices, etc.

Steelcase continually works with its supply chain on sustainability material sourcing topics like phasing out materials of concern and conflict mineral reporting, as well as participates in GRI reporting as part of our annual Corporate Sustainability Report. However, due to the scope of work, the Steelcase CSR does not report comprehensively on raw material source and extraction reporting- thus is not applicable to option 1 of this credit at this time.

  • Steelcase Phase 2 Program meets the Option 2 “Extended Producer Responsibility” criteria.
  • Steelcase products can contribute to the “recycled content” and “materials reuse” criteria.
  • Select Steelcase materials have the potential to contribute to the “wood products”.
  • A limited selection of surface materials have the potential to contribute to the “bio-based materials” criteria.

New LEED V4: Building Product Disclosure and Optimization— Material Ingredient Reporting

  • Addresses transparency in material ingredients and selecting products with optimized ingredients.
  • Rewards the use of products with ingredient reporting in programs like Cradle to Cradle™ certification and Health Product Declarations.

Steelcase Cradle to Cradle™ certified products have the potential to contribute to this credit requirements. Contribution weightings will depend on level of certification.

Revised Credit: Construction and Demolition Waste Management

  • Added an option for waste reduction strategy.
  • Requires waste diversion from multiple material types.

Steelcase and dealer partners can help project teams estimate the weight of packaging from their furniture shipments.


Interior Design + Construction: Indoor Environmental Quality Credits

Credit: Updated and consolidated, Low-Emitting Interiors

  • Credit is a combination of the “Low-Emitting Materials” credits.
  • Requirements based on VOC emissions rather than VOC content.
  • Systems approach to emissions within a space.
  • Added requirement for TVOC disclosure.
  • Modified requirements for formaldehyde.

Steelcase furniture certified for SCS Indoor Advantage™ may contribute depending on options. Products that contribute will demonstrate certification compliance to:

  • ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1
  • ANSI/BIFMA e3 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Credits 7.6.1 and 7.6.2
  • California Specification 01350 for classrooms

Updated and Renamed Credit: Quality Views

  • Credit title renamed from “Daylight and Views—Views”.
  • Added requirement for quality view, defined by the LEED 2009 exemplary performance criteria.

Steelcase offers several products and thought starters to help achieve the requirements of this credit – yet, several other factors play into achieving this credit, beyond the scope of furniture.

New Credit: Acoustic Performance

  • Added requirements for room noise levels, speech privacy and sound isolation, reverberation time, as well as paging, masking, and sound reinforcement systems.
  • Harmonized ANSI and ASHRAE standards.

While Steelcase has sound-tested architectural and workstation products, as well as sound masking products, contributions are limited due to the various other factors that can come into play for this credit.


Building Operations + Maintenance: Materials and Resources Credits

Updated and Renamed:
Purchasing— Facility Maintenance and Renovations

  • Credit title changed from Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions.
  • Incorporates purchasing requirements for furniture from the Sustainable Purchasing—Durables Goods credit.
  • Added an option that rewards projects for having no alternations or furniture purchasing.
  • All Steelcase contributions will be centered around Option 2. Furniture.

Steelcase products are designed to be long-lasting and durable—often making reuse a feasible option, depending on project needs and desirability. Steelcase Cradle to Cradle™ certified products have the potential to contribute to this credit requirement. Contribution weightings will depend on level of certification.

Steelcase furniture certified for SCS Indoor Advantage™ may contribute depending on options. Products that contribute will demonstrate certification compliance to:

  • ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1
  • ANSI/BIFMA e3 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Credits 7.6.1 and 7.6.2
  • California Specification 01350 for classrooms
  • Steelcase Phase 2 Program meets the Option 2 “Extended Producer Responsibility” criteria.
  • Steelcase products can contribute to the “recycled content” and “materials reuse” criteria.
  • Select Steelcase materials have the potential to contribute to the “wood products”.
  • A limited selection of surface materials have the potential to contribute to the “bio-based materials” criteria.

Credit: Solid waste management — ongoing

  • Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that reuses, recycles, or composts various materials.

Steelcase’s Victor 2, is an in-office recycling center that provides options for easy sorting and collection of compost, paper, plastics, returnables, other recyclable materials, and waste.


Pilot Credits

The following credits are potential contribution points for Steelcase products and applications.

As a reminder, an additional credit point is available in the Innovation category for “achieving one pilot credit from the USGBC’s LEED Pilot Credit Library.”

Environmentally Preferable finishes and furnishings
BD+C, ID+C

  • Use finishes and furnishings that have verified multi-attribute environmental certifications
  • Focus is on sourcing products that meet the ANSI/BIFMA e3 Sustainability Standard

Dozens of Steelcase products are level® certified. Documentation can be found on Steelcase’s website (www.steelcase.com). Steelcase’s certified products span from level® 1, 2, or 3, depending on product style and options selected.

Social equity in the supply chain
BD+C

  • Promotes fair trade, respect for human rights & equity, and healthier environments
  • Asks for documentation of tier 1 supplier signature to the end-manufacturer’s supplier code of conduct

—or—

  • Documentation of compliance to ANSI/BIFMA e3 Social Equity section

Steelcase can provide documentation of compliance to ANSI/BIFMA e3 Sustainability Standard – Social Responsibility sections 8.7.2.1 and 8.7.2.2

Design for active occupants
BD+C, ID+C, O+M

  • Strategy 10. Provide equipment or exercise opportunities for at least 5% of FTE occupants that can be used at workstations, to allow for physical activity while working at their desks
  • Includes tread-desks, stationary bicycles, exercise ball chairs, etc.

Steelcase WalkStation and Turnstone Buoy promote the active movement of the user during work, and are solutions that can help, in part, to achieving this pilot credit.


References

  1. “The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse,” National Trust for Historic Preservation, 2011.The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse.
  2. LEED v4 User Guide, US. Green Building Council, accessed January 10, 2015: http://www.usgbc.org/articles/ get-know-leed-v4-leed-v4-user-guide
  3. “The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse,” National Trust for Historic Preservation, 2011.
  4. “A Closer Look at Materials and Resources in LEED v4,” U.S. Green Building Council, accessed January 10, 2015: http://www.usgbc.org/ articles/green-building-facts
  5. LEED Credit Library, U.S. Green Building Council, accessed March 17, 2015: http://www.usgbc.org/ node/4742780?return=/credits

Source: Steelcase White Papers